Ways to Give

Cash
The most common method used in making a charitable gift is contributing cash.

IRA Contribution (no tax consequence)
This provision allows individual taxpayers aged 70 1/2 and older to make a charitable contribution up to $100,000 to St. Teresa's Academy from their Individual Retirement Accounts (IRAs) directly to St. Teresa's Academy with NO tax bill. 

Securities
Making a gift of appreciated stock is one of the most advantageous forms of giving for tax reasons. You can write off the value of the stock as a gift, plus avoid capital gains tax. The gift is valued as the sale price of the stock upon trade.

Real Estate/Property
Gifts of appreciated real estate/property are similar to gifts of appreciated stock. If you have owned the real estate/property for 12 months or more, you will avoid capital gains taxes and deduct the fair market value of the real estate/property. The gift is valued as the fair-market value of the asset.

Charitable Remainder Trusts
These types of trusts are funded with an asset, such as appreciated property or securities, and the earnings are paid as income to you and your beneficiaries. Upon the death of the last beneficiary, the principal goes to St. Teresa's Academy. In addition, you may amend a 401(k) or IRA to include St. Teresa's as beneficiary. The gift is valued as the total amount of the principal.

Charitable Lead Trusts
Charitable Lead Trusts are funded with an asset, such as appreciated property or securities, and the earnings are contributed to St. Teresa's for the life of the trust. When the trust reaches its termination date, the principal goes to your beneficiaries. The gift is valued as the total of the earnings contributed from the creation of the trust to the termination.

Bequests
Bequests may be made through your will. They may include a specific dollar amount or a percentage of your estate. The gift is valued as the fair-market value of the assets.

Life Insurance
You may donate by making St. Teresa's Academy the owner and beneficiary of your insurance policy. The premiums on a donated policy are also deductible. If you are finished paying for the gifted policy, your gift is the replacement value or the cost basis of the policy, whichever is less. You may also donate a life insurance policy on which you are still making premium payments. The gift is valued as the total sum of the premiums.

For questions or additional information, please contact Barbara Cusick, Director of Development, at bcusick@stteresasacademy.org or 816.501.0031.